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1993matias

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Reply #3870 on: May 28, 2015, 08:15:55 am
3871

I like your airline reports, keep them coming :)


jameswyhk

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Reply #3871 on: May 28, 2015, 05:55:11 pm
3872

Thank you :)

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Reply #3872 on: May 29, 2015, 09:05:03 pm
3873

We need them to keep the forum a little bit active :D


1993matias

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Reply #3873 on: May 31, 2015, 06:51:07 pm
3874

Invite your friends :D


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Reply #3874 on: June 05, 2015, 01:55:22 pm
3825

I'm done! I'm officially a commercial pilot with instrument and multi-engine ratings. Currently doing a multi crew course. I hate the 737 - the yoke sucks. You only ever use 1 hand to fly it anyway, might as well not have half of it anyway. And it's heavy, awkward, stupid and much better if replaced with a simple non-force-feedback sidestick.
O0 Lotus Airlines of India (PW#2650) •


1993matias

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Reply #3875 on: June 06, 2015, 10:20:18 am
3876

Wow, congratulations!
I preferred the A320 anyway :P


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Reply #3876 on: June 18, 2015, 01:34:05 pm
3877

Just be glad that you are a pilot ;)


1993matias

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Reply #3877 on: June 18, 2015, 10:43:36 pm
3878

Who will you get to fly with, VS?


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Reply #3878 on: June 21, 2015, 12:41:59 am
3879

Congrats, VS.

I would prefer Boeing's yoke than Airbus' sidestick as a passenger. I understand the sidestick was designed to minimise fatigue, but I just can't trust my life on one person's one hand.

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Reply #3879 on: June 21, 2015, 10:06:45 am
3879

I would prefer Boeing's yoke than Airbus' sidestick as a passenger. I understand the sidestick was designed to minimise fatigue, but I just can't trust my life on one person's one hand.

All pilots fly using one hand on the yoke only. One hand on the yoke/stick, and one hand on the throttle, regardless of the aircraft. This has been beaten into every single pilot from the very first flight we took ;). In other words, half the yoke on a Boeing, Cessna, Piper, Embraer, Tupolev etc. is purely for cosmetic purposes, and has never been used.


Who will you get to fly with, VS?

I'm hoping for a major Irish airline actually. I am willing to take most offers in the beginning however.


O0 Lotus Airlines of India (PW#2650) •


1993matias

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Reply #3880 on: June 21, 2015, 10:20:59 am
3881

"Most" so not that other, big Irish airline? They fly 737s exclusively ;)


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Reply #3881 on: June 21, 2015, 10:39:04 am
3882

All pilots fly using one hand on the yoke only. One hand on the yoke/stick, and one hand on the throttle, regardless of the aircraft. This has been beaten into every single pilot from the very first flight we took ;). In other words, half the yoke on a Boeing, Cessna, Piper, Embraer, Tupolev etc. is purely for cosmetic purposes, and has never been used.

Yes, but there is feedback on Boeing's yokes, while there isn't on Airbus' sidesticks.

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Reply #3882 on: June 22, 2015, 10:54:54 pm
3882

Vastly overrated, and force feedback can be integrated into a sidestick as well.

Airbus has significantly better systems, both safety and handling wise. The 737 is a 1960'era design that has been updated with a patchwork of updates, and is really rather basic. The 737 lacks a great deal of basic safety systems, and still suffers from a number of dangerous flaws. Boeing has only really caught up with the 787. From a pilots view, the age of the 737 really shows. The 737 is still very much a hands-on aircraft, and that is not necessarily a good thing when flying IFR at 30.000 ft and passing through turbulent conditions.
One example of the 737 being inferior to the A320 is when performing a go-around. In the A320 you press the "Take-off/Go-around" button, the aircraft applies max thrust and retracts gear, flaps on schedule and speedbrakes on it's own, and flies the entire missed approach procedure by itself unless the crew interferes. The 737 gives you take-off power and initial missed approach only. In severe cases, 737s have crashed because the speedbrakes weren't retracted. Why hasn't it been solved? Boeing avoided a massive lawsuit against it in the 80s and 90s, involving the lack of this function. Fitting the function today would be akin to admitting the fault, and facing new lawsuits. It would have been avoided had they done a clean sheet replacement of the 737, rather than the 737MAX.
The A320 is far more intuitive to fly. Any pilot can learn how to fly an A320 within a single day, it is that easy to fly. The downside being that the systems are a bit complex. Should a single minor system fail enroute, a reset may cause the system to not restart properly when the aircraft has landed and is being prepared for departure. In that case, you need to get a mechanic on the phone to solve the issue. It's minor maintenance issues, not any that affect flight safety.
 
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jameswyhk

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Reply #3883 on: June 26, 2015, 09:29:39 pm
3884

I wasn't trying to get into a Boeing vs Airbus debate here. It sounds to me as though a "Automatic vs Manual" argument. Both options has advantages and disadvantages of their own. I personally would prefer controls with feedback, even if there are more "hassles" for it. And I appreciate it's your preference to have easy controls.

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1993matias

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Reply #3884 on: June 28, 2015, 08:01:35 pm
3885

The worry most people might have with a computerized aircraft is that if the systems fail, you have now way to fly the plane. But with so many redundancies, it'll not happen


 

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